Tom Baril: Wet-Plates November 14 — December 31, 2003

Although originally known as a master printmaker working for Robert Mapplethorpe while still a student in New York, Tom Baril's true passion has always been taking photographs. When not in the darkroom, Baril was quietly making his own photographs while perfecting his printing of Mapplethorpe's images. Initially he avoided the studio to distance himself from Mapplethorpe's work, focusing on landscapes and urban architecture, like the Chrysler building, which has become one of the best known and most distinctive images of this frequently photographed building.

Baril did eventually shift his focus to the studio, photographing still-lifes, nudes, and objects with a pinhole camera -- it wasn't until 1994 that he began to photograph flowers. "Photographing flowers is a no-brainer… They are beautiful…get the picture in focus, don't screw up the lighting and you should make a great picture every time. That's the problem I have with photographing flowers -- one of the reasons I rejected the subject for years," said Baril. However, he succeeded in changing the way people look at flowers. Few photographers are capable of getting viewers to look at something as familiar as a flower with such a new and fresh perspective. "If I am successful, the photograph reveals the underbelly, the overlooked and the under appreciated."

Today, Baril carries on his passion for producing exquisite imagery from both behind the camera and in the darkroom. In Wet-Plates, Baril will exhibit his newest flora pieces which show his mastery over 19th century Collodion wet plate and Ambrotype processes. Although these processes are new to him, Baril is no stranger to working with antiquated formats. Having created some of his best known work with a $45 pinhole camera, it seems only natural that Tom Baril would move back to the roots of photography instead of embracing the digital technology of the 21st century.

Tom Baril has enjoyed great success over the past ten years, exhibiting throughout the United States. His second monograph, Botanica was released by Arena Editions in 2000 following his sold out self-titled monograph from 1997, published by 4AD. His work is in numerous prestigious private and public collections including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, The Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University (Cambridge, MA) and The Stedelijk Museum (Amsterdam).

All wet-plate images are gelatin silver prints made from Collodion wet-plate negatives. Images vary in size from 20 x 16," 24 x 30" and 30 x 40" in various editions. Prices range from $1800 to $5000 depending on size and availability. Select images are also available as one-of-a-kind Ambrotypes ranging in size from 5 x 4" to 10 x 8".

The early work is available 23 x 18" and 34 x 26" toned gelatin silver prints, mounted slightly larger, made in editions of 25 and 10 respectively. Prices range from $1600 to $3500 (small) and $4000 to $9500 (large), depending where they are in the edition.

Please call: (312) 266-2350 for prices of specific pieces.
Prices are print only unless otherwise indicated.

Tom Baril
Apples, 2003
Tom Baril
Begonia [Ref. 775], 2003
Tom Baril
Bethlemhem Steel 2 [Ref. 782], 2003
Tom Baril
Bethlemhem Steel 3 [Ref. 783], 2003
Tom Baril
Cobaea Buds [Ref. 763], 2002
Tom Baril
Cobaea Pods [Ref. 762], 2002
Tom Baril
Hale Bale [Ref. 790], 2003
Tom Baril
Hermes, 2002
Tom Baril
Hornet's Nest, 2002
Tom Baril
Hornet's Nest [Ref. 825], 2002
Tom Baril
Pears, 2002
Tom Baril
Red Delicious Apples [Ref. 791], 2003
Tom Baril
Roses in Vase [Ref. 760], 2002
Tom Baril
Summer Squash, 2003
Tom Baril
Three Pears, 2003
Tom Baril
Tomatoes [Ref. 766], 2002
Tom Baril
Two Callas (daylight studio) [Ref. 777], 2002
Tom Baril
Two Callas [Ref. 826], 2002
Tom Baril
Two Roses [Ref. 840], 2002
Tom Baril
White Dahlia, 2003

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